OOP Fundamentals: Quick and Dirty Guide to Testing

There are entire books written on testing. And it surely feels more an art than a science. My approach is similar to Kent Beck’s:

I get paid for code that works, not for tests, so my philosophy is to test as little as possible to reach a given level of confidence (I suspect this level of confidence is high compared to industry standards, but that could just be hubris). If I don’t typically make a kind of mistake (like setting the wrong variables in a constructor), I don’t test for it. I do tend to make sense of test errors, so I’m extra careful when I have logic with complicated conditionals. When coding on a team, I modify my strategy to carefully test code that we, collectively, tend to get wrong.

https://stackoverflow.com/a/153565/1015566

He goes on to add that different people will have different strategies and, at the end of the day, you just have to do what works best for you and your team. Extremely practical, and the approach I personally follow.

This won’t be a detailed post on every possible topic on tests and testing in Object-oriented Programming (OOP). There are many books about that already. Instead, this article will cover the basics of testing, so you understand how and why we test, and you can adapt it to your own needs.

Continue reading “OOP Fundamentals: Quick and Dirty Guide to Testing”

Integrating FileMaker’s Data API and Ruby with the fmrest-ruby gem

We often work on projects that intersect two technologies near and dear to us: FileMaker and Ruby. This allows us to build robust web applications in Ruby on Rails, integrated with data sources from FileMaker solutions. When Claris introduced the FileMaker Data API we were naturally curious to try it out. At the time there was no off-the-shelf Ruby library for us to simply gem install, so we decided to roll up our sleeves and build one. Thus, fmrest-ruby was born.

This article will walk you through setting up and using fmrest-ruby in a Ruby on Rails project. Some level of familiarity with Ruby/Rails and FileMaker’s Data API is advised, although much of the content covered here is applicable to any Ruby project, Rails or not.

Continue reading “Integrating FileMaker’s Data API and Ruby with the fmrest-ruby gem”

OOP Fundamentals: The Decorator Pattern

The decorator pattern is one of my favorite patterns. It is simple, extensible and powerful. It feels like it follows the essence of object oriented programming beautifully. Sadly though, it is also easy to be misused or misunderstood. So, in this post I will show you the essence of the decorator pattern, illustrated with a few examples.

Continue reading “OOP Fundamentals: The Decorator Pattern”

OOP Fundamentals: The Dependency Inversion Principle

The dependency inversion principle is one of the cornerstones of object-oriented programming. Without it, there is no object-oriented design. It’s that important.

Continue reading “OOP Fundamentals: The Dependency Inversion Principle”

bBox for FileMaker v0.96 with JSON processing, Python 3 and more

We are pleased to release bBox version 0.96, with JSON processing via jq, Python 3 compile/run,  and improvements supporting Zsh, cURL and Ruby.

bBox is a free utility plug-in to extend FileMaker solutions to easily use code libraries and macOS-based functions from Python, JavaScript, PHP, Ruby, AppleScript, C/C++, Bash/sh, XPath, and SQLite. Also included is a demo file that has over 210 examples of how you can put bBox functions to work for you.

Continue reading “bBox for FileMaker v0.96 with JSON processing, Python 3 and more”

Something out of Nothing: Null Object Pattern

What is nothing? nil? null? undefined? A vast void of emptiness that fills your soul with dread? Oh sorry, that’s just my stomach.

We often think of nothing as… well, nothing. It’s when something doesn’t exist and therefore cannot be interacted with. So in our code, we try account for having nothing. No User? No problem.

Continue reading “Something out of Nothing: Null Object Pattern”

Ruby’s Safe Navigation Operator &. and is it a Code Smell?

What is &.?

Ruby devs are probably all too familiar with seeing this error:

NoMethodError (undefined method `foo' for nil:NilClass)

Most of the time, it’s probably due to a typo, but every now and then we end up having to do something like:

defined?(bar) && bar.foo
# returns nil if bar is nil

If you’re on Rails, or are using ActiveSupport, you can use present? or try():

Continue reading “Ruby’s Safe Navigation Operator &. and is it a Code Smell?”

Composition over Inheritance, with JavaScript examples

If you are into object-oriented programming, you most likely have heard about composition over inheritance. The concept itself is simple: Whenever possible, prefer to compose objects rather than introducing inheritance.

Continue reading “Composition over Inheritance, with JavaScript examples”

Common Code Smells in OOP

Over years of reviewing Ruby code, the same things tend to come up over and over. In this post, I’d like to address some of the most common code smells I find when reviewing OOP code (and Ruby code in particular).

Continue reading “Common Code Smells in OOP”
1 2